George Bryan Golf Academy
George E. Bryan, III
803-781-2063
georgebryangolfacademy.com

What I love about the NFL season is this time of the year and the Viking/Saints game was an example. The game was decided on the last play, with no time left on the clock. Several players on each team elevated their performance to a brand-new level in this one game. Drew Breeze, the QB for the Saints, did what he has done in the past, and that is play phenomenal. The QB for the Vikings did what he has never done. He threw a game-winning touchdown pass on the final play of the playoff in the NFL. Case Keenum was simply magical last Sunday but he must have already been pretty good to be a starter in the NFL. Who knew he was this good? Wonder if he did?

The Saints scored to go ahead with less than a minute on the clock and the TV camera panned over to Keenum. His head was down, in his hands, almost in his lap, displaying disappointment.

When Vikings got the ball with 25 seconds left on the clock, Keenum accessed something that few have ever displayed. In a very short time span, just a few plays, he demonstrated poise, and athletic brilliance under pressure that surely will be talked about for years. He performed “outside” of his previous best.

Last week, the lesson theme was passion. This week, another vital ingredient that is vital to success is failure. That’s right, it’s essential too, not optional. I would contend that Case Keenum, just before he entered the game with less than half of a minute to play, had feelings of failure. His body language certainly displayed such. On the heels of perceived failure, possibly inspired by the feelings of failure, the young quarterback reached deep into himself and found a performance recipe that was superb and brand new. Maybe the best part was it was in a situation, under NFL Play-off pressure.

There is a way to tap into your golf performance reservoir by simply viewing a disappointment or failure differently. This viewpoint could be accompanied by a reaction that is performance enhancing. This is demonstrated by a brand new 3-6 year old in golf without exception in my experience. There is an attempt, and another attempt, and another attempt, in succession. In most cases, the attempts or the effort is with eagerness and interest to see what happens if there is contact. If there is no contact, in some cases the initiative becomes more fun. Seldom is there an adverse reaction to a foul ball or whiff in the early stages of development. Typically, there is the determination in that next attempt with possibly more intensity or focus. There are also problem-solving tactics used that will be covered next week so stay tuned.

Before recognizing some local youth golf participants, I’ll sum up today’s lesson; failure is one of the necessary ingredients to developing skill competency. Attempts are healthy because there is feedback available. We need feedback to create the solution for the performance recipe and equation.

Our Youth learn fast because of their attitude about learning and the following ICRC Winter Tour players endured temperatures in the high 30’s and low 40’s to enjoy golf with the families in the youngest division players enjoyed playing a modified captains choice format where they play captains choice to the green then everyone putts out. Congratulations to these players and their caddies for braving the cold Andrew Bateman, Daniel Davis, Kat Furie, Corley Grosjean, Charlie Henson, Hutson Hinrichs, Mikey Koen, Adysen Langdale, Yosi Mallett, Banks Smith, Troy Wadford.

 

George Bryan Golf Academy

803-781-2063

www.georgebryangolfacademy.com